Archive for ‘History Facts’

July 4, 2014

molly pitcher

Molly Pitcher, real name Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly, was sixteen when she married a barber named William Hays. When her husband went to war, Molly went too. In the Battle of Monmouth on July 28, 1778, she carried pitchers of water to the soldiers and got her nickname, Molly Pitcher. When her husband was wounded in the battle of Monmouth, she took over his place at the cannon. After the battle, General Washington found out about her heroic actions. He then named her Sergeant Molly.

Source: http://www.about.com

July 4, 2014

4th july

A 17-year old student designed the flag as it appears today. In anticipation of Alaska and Hawaii becoming states, Robert G. Heft created the 50-star flag as part of a history project (for which he received a B-). In August of 1959, President Dwight D. Eisenhower chose Heft’s design over 1,500 other applicants and informed him of the news over the phone. (Heft’s teacher also changed his grade to an A).

Source: http://www.mentalfloss.com

February 11, 2014

feb11

Lincoln was the first president to be born outside of the original thirteen colonies.

Source: http://www.constitutioncenter.org

November 27, 2013

nov27th

The first Macy’s Parade took place in 1924 and was referred to as the Macy’s Christmas Parade. It started as a gimmick to promote Macy’s stores, the employees dressed as various characters like clowns and cowboys, and walked Central Park Zoo animals along a 60-mile-long route that stretched from Midtown Manhattan to Harlem.

Source: www.thedailymeal.com

November 21, 2013

nov21

Sarah Josepha Hale, an American magazine editor, persuaded Abraham Lincoln to declare Thanksgiving a national holiday.  She is also the author of the popular nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb”

Source: www.whsv.com

November 19, 2013

nov19

Benjamin Franklin loved electricity. He also loved the turkey. One day, he put the two together.

It all started as a party trick. Franklin had been dabbling with electricity for years, and he wanted to show off his newest electrical toys. On April 29, 1749, Franklin told scientist Peter Collinson about his dream to host the world’s first electric dinner party.

In the following months, Franklin spent his spare time electrocuting chickens and turkeys in his backyard with Leyden jars, primitive batteries that store static electricity. Toasting turkey, however, was hard. Most shocks knocked the birds unconscious, which scared Franklin, since they kept appearing to rise from the dead. But in the winter of 1750, Franklin finally fried a turkey, making him the first person to slaughter a living thing with electricity.

On December 23, 1750, Franklin got a chance to show off his bird frying skills. A crowd gathered, the turkey was contained, and Franklin readied the lethal charge. Suddenly, a bright flash of light engulfed Franklin, shocking him senseless. The turkey gobbled away, and Franklin was numb for the rest of the evening. Although his chest was painfully sore, Franklin’s worst injury was a badly bruised ego.

Source: www.mentalfloss.com

September 26, 2013

sept26

John Adams was the only President to be defeated by his Vice President, Thomas Jefferson.

Source: www.vicepresidents.com

July 25, 2013

Reel Em’ In!

july25

Fly fishing has been around for more than 2000 years. There is even evidence of the use of flies tied on bone hooks as early as 1400 BC in Egypt.

Source: www.dailyutahchronicle.com