Posts tagged ‘Halloween’

October 30, 2014

National Candy Corn Day

Candy-Corn

35 million pounds of candy corn are produced each year.  That’s enough candy corn to circle the moon 21 times.

Source: http://www.jwilsononline.com

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October 29, 2014

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The bonfire has long been associated with Halloween and continues to be a common tradition in much of the Halloween celebrating world.

The practice of lighting large fires dates back to roots of Halloween in the festival of Samhain which celebrated the summer’s end and the beginning of the dark season. Samhain also marked the end of the old year and the beginning of the new. On the eve of Samhain, young people would go from house to house asking for food offerings and kindling for the Samhain fires. The following day, the traditional day of Samhain, November 1st, people would extinguish their hearth fires and gather together to light large fires on sacred hill tops to make offerings to the gods.

Crops and the bones of animals which had been collected were burnt in the fires as offerings. Our modern word, bonfire, comes from the words bone and fire and refers to this practice.

Source: http://www.hauntedbay.com/

October 31, 2013

Happy Halloween!

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Trick or treating,  began in the Middle-Ages, children and sometimes poor adults would dress up  in costumes and go around door to door  begging for food or money in exchange for songs and prayers, often said on  behalf of the dead.  This was called “souling” and the children were called  “soulers”.  The food given was most often soul cakes, which was a small round cake that represented a soul being freed from Purgatory when the cake was eaten.

Source: www.blog.smithsonianmag.com

October 30, 2013

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 The Amazon’s payara or vampire fish has some serious fangs—about two inches (five centimeters) long, to be precise. Cavities in the roof of the fish’s mouth sheath these natural daggers when they’re not embedded in prey. Despite the name, the payara doesn’t actually suck blood.

Source: www.newswatch.nationalgeographic.com

October 29, 2013

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In the animated television classic “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown”, Charlie Brown getting a rock instead of Halloween candy led to many people mailing candy in boxes addressed to Charlie Brown. Peter Robbins, the 10 year-old child who voiced Charlie Brown, however, was not so lucky. When he went trick or treating that year, he received a lot of rocks.

Source: www.chicagonow.com

October 28, 2013

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The word “witch” comes from the old Anglo-Saxon word “wicca” meaning “wise one”.  The earliest witches were respected dealers in charms, medical herbs and fortune telling.

October 26, 2013

HauntedMansion

The hitchhiking ghosts in Disney’s The Haunted Mansion ride have names.  They are  Phineas (Traveler), Ezra (Skeleton) and Gus (Prisoner).

Source: www.babble.com

October 24, 2013

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The first candy apple was created in 1908 by William Kolb of Newark, New Jersey.   Kolb a candy maker was looking for ways to expand sales of his red cinnamon candy during the Christmas season and used an apple on a stick as a way to display the brightly colored candy in the shop window.  It didn’t take long for the new treat to take off and soon he was selling thousands of them each year.

Source: www.fillyourplate.org